The Pariah – Graham Masterton

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As my journey with horror books was just beginning to blossom I had plenty of venues to go to with plenitude of choices, all of them trying to reach out to me, screaming “Read me! Go on, read me!”. It was all sorts of confusing as there was no internet to find out if a book was good, there wasn’t really that much magazines committed to writing about books plus I wasn’t coming off a wealthy family. Anyway…
My aunt had a shelf full of books in her spare room, her older brother had few cabinets with a massive variety and their youngest sibling, my mum, had her lot. It was enough to get me going to see which author tastes the best.
“The Pariah” brought my attention with its cover and then at the back there was a bit copied from the book itself that just grabbed my wrists and dragged me through some invisible doors to a little town called Granitehead. I was about to meet John, an antiquarian who just lost his wife and unborn child in a horrific car accident.
It is a real tragedy that drowns John in great depression until one day the sadness changes into madness that no one could really predict.
The peacefully little town soon becomes a scene of unexplained gore events that sparks John interest. Amongst vision of his wife haunting him very now and again which also includes sexual tension between him and his “wife”, John realises that things lead to him and a small purchase of a painting he made not long ago.
The painting depicts the cape where John now lives and soon after acquiring it a mysterious man arrives wanting to buy the painting off John.
Eventually John discovers some incredible information that lead him to a completely different world where Aztecs’ Mictlantecuhtli is linked to the town of Granitehead that isn’t far away from Salem and where an ancient history seems to be repeating itself in modern times….
I’ll leave it here. The whole book kept me away from the world until I finished reading it, the ending was an absolute shocker that left me with my jaw wide open, unable to say: “noooo…this is just not right….” I felt for John I really did but I was also glad to find Masterton.
One of his first books “The Pariah” takes one fact from the past and brings the possible horror into the presence. I think the fact that Masterton could use a legend, myth, a story that was passed from mouth to mouth and then create a whole believable world around and scare the living life out me, made me such a horror junkie that rarely could get scared by anything the cinema had to offer.

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